X

Hypnagogic Altlas

Exhibition Title: Hypnagogic Atlas
Artists: Dario Ghibaudo – David Hochbaum
Dates: November 22nd 2019 – January 10th 2020
Opening Reception: Friday November 22nd, 7-9pm
Both artists present

Hypnagogic Altlas

Exhibition Title: Hypnagogic Atlas
Artists: Dario Ghibaudo – David Hochbaum
Dates: November 22nd 2019 – January 10th 2020
Opening Reception: Friday November 22nd, 7-9pm
Both artists present

... more

ENGLISH- scroll down für Deutsch

Exhibition Title: Hypnagogic Atlas
Artists: Dario Ghibaudo – David Hochbaum
Dates: November 22nd 2019 – January 10th 2020
Opening Reception: Friday November 22nd, 7-9pm – Both artists present

“The most characteristic slumber, the one most appropriate to the exercise of the art… is the slumber which I call ‘the slumber with a key,’ … you must resolve the problem of ‘sleeping without sleeping,’ which is the essence of the dialectics of the dream, since it is a repose which walks in equilibrium on the taut and invisible wire which separates sleeping from waking.”
Salvador Dali

The American artist David Hochbaum and the Italian sculptor Dario Ghibaudo are both wild creators of fantastic universes born out their florid imagination and their own personal mythology and peculiar vision of world and society.  The fictive reality they create, each in his own way due drastic differences of media, style, color and composition, offer to the viewer a perspective on realms populated by fantastic creatures and marvellous animals, waltzing around imaginary towns, natural places or just conquering the room space with their presence – inviting the spectator to reflect on his/her own reality and inner journey.

Masked as playful scientific catalogue the works by Dario Ghibaudo out of his series “Museum Of Unnatural History”, ongoing since 1990, truly face the theme of human condition. Animals and plants out of the ordinary, that at first sight seem recognisable, are gradually discovered from the viewer as the most exotic and improbable fruits of a wild imagination, or a genetically modified experiment, turned wrong. The anomalous is perceived more then seen, also in this case, exactly as it happens in the real natural world, as much as in human society and even in psychology. The borders of “normality” are fluid and change so radically following so many factors such as culture, religion, geography, politics, family dynamics and education, that except for some extreme cases, are very hard to set.
The collection of Ghibaudo’s weird creatures remind us of our inner weirdness, exotism and unicity as to underline that all the peculiar characteristics that makes each one of us as a unique being, are our strength. At the same time those characteristics could be the triggering excuses for all those social tensions and discriminations fruit of the human difficulty of accepting what is different and external of our own personal micro-cosmos, on a personal level as much as on the communal one. Fact underlined by the many references to the captivity of exotic animals, plants and “curiosities” – people included – collected by explorers and scientists over the centuries. Ghibaudo gives life to his astonishing, fantastic creatures, going further than Salvador Dali, who created monstrous sculptures in bronze, just by stretching their proportions. Dario gave his animals life, skin, breath, thoughts and emotions. We believe the artist that they are one hundred percent real, thanks to the choice of the material he uses. Limoges porcelain is on of the most fragile materials used for sculptures. By choosing it, the artist tells us that the world and the existence of these creatures is fragile, they are an endangered species, needing protection and respect, as a symbolic invitation to protect and nourish ourselves and all the peculiarities making us unique.

David Hochbaum spends a lot of time photographing the places he frequented as a child and as a young man, to inject the figurative element of a specific place and time. This process mixed with the spontaneous creation in the studio allows him to recreate and reinvent his memories and his personal history, adding subtle references of current events happening to and around him. His collages of cities and towers reflect the surroundings of the cities he lived and the places he has traveled over the years. The cities in Hochbaum’s work are at the same time portraits and landscapes, giving to the layers of architecture, the elements and gestures of humans. The people become the cities and the cities become portraits of the figures. And as mythology used to pass over the universal knowledge of the spirit of the days, the personal mythification of the artist’s life and of the people in it gives us a blink on some of the spirit of our time, rich with hopes, desires, emotions, memories and dreams.

It seems that the art of both Hochbaum and Ghibaudo are strongly influenced by the surrealists movements, but by different sides of it.
Dario Ghibaudo modellates Limoges porcelain with his hands to create the population of his bestiary, and with the exception of sporadic use of golden leaf he lives his creations uncolored. In his work we could see the selectivity of the academic approach to surrealism -the sonorous silence-  like in Kay Sage’s paintings, or the grace, the refinement and the non traditionality of some of Dali’s masterpieces.
David Hochbaum’s works are the result of experiments with all the fine art techniques he learned during his studies, such as photography, painting, woodworking, film and sculpture. The colors are often loud and the composition is rich of disparate elements spinning around recurring themes and subjects, subtly inviting us to recognise in them the richness and playfulness of symbolic meanings, like Max Ernst.

But the most evident art historical reference in Hochbaum’s work is the one referring to the famous painting “The Tower Of Babel” of Pieter Bruegel the elder.
Hochbaum ‘s first encounter with the Flemish painter was when he was around 7 years old while he was rifling through his mother’s books. He was thunderstruck by the detailed landscapes and colors that mirrored the over saturated whimsical worlds of children’s books such as the work of Richard Scarry, which he obsessed over at this time of his life. The moment when he came across the image of The Tower Of Babel and The Triumph Of Death is what the artist refers to as “The moment I came online in terms of recognizing an overwhelming emotional response to art and realizing its potential power to move.” Decades later Hochbaum continues to reference the Flemish artist through color and structure, . With this influence he builds his own narrative through his manipulation of concept, media and infusing his own personal journey and contemporary life.

DEUTSCH

Ausstellungstitel: Hypnagogischer Atlas
Künstler: Dario Ghibaudo – David Hochbaum
Termine: 22. November 2019 – 10. Januar 2020
Vernissage: Freitag, 22. November, 19-21 Uhr

„Der charakteristischste Schlummer, der für die Ausübung der Kunst am besten geeignet ist … ist der Schlummer, den ich ‘den Schlaf mit einem Schlüssel’ nenne … Sie müssen das Problem des Schlafens ohne Schlaf lösen, dass das Wesen der Dialektik des Traumes ist, denn es ist eine Ruhepause, die im Gleichgewicht entlang eines engen und unsichtbaren Drahtes geht, der das Schlafen vom Wachen trennt. “
Salvador Dali

Der amerikanische Künstler David Hochbaum und der italienische Bildhauer Dario Ghibaudo sind beide wilde Schöpfer fantastischer Universen, sie sind aus ihrer blühenden Vorstellungskraft, ihrer eigenen persönlichen Mythologie und besonderen Vision von Welt und Gesellschaft hervorgegangen. Beide Künstler machen ihre eigene Art und benutzen drastischen Methoden in Medien, Stil, Farbe und Komposition. Die fiktive Realität, die sie erschaffen, bietet dem Betrachter eine Perspektive auf Bereiche, die von fantastischen Kreaturen und wunderbaren Tieren bevölkert . Diese letzte streifen durch imaginäre Städte und Orte oder erleben den Raum nur mit ihrer Präsenz. Sie läden den Betrachter ein, über seine eigene Realität und innere Reise nachzudenken.

Als spielerischer wissenschaftlicher Katalog maskiert stellen sich die Werke von Dario Ghibaudo aus seiner Serie “Museum of Unnatural History”, laufende seit 1990, dem Thema der Menschlichkeit. Tiere und Pflanzen, die auf den ersten Blick erkennbar erscheinen, werden vom Betrachter allmählich als die exotischsten und unwahrscheinlichsten Früchte einer wilden Fantasie oder eines gentechnisch veränderten Experiments entdeckt. Das Anomale wird mehr wahrgenommen als gesehen, auch in diesem Fall, genau wie in der realen natürlichen Welt, in der menschlichen Gesellschaft und sogar in der Psychologie. Die Grenzen der “Normalität” sind fließend und verändern sich so radikal durch so viele Faktoren wie Kultur, Religion, Geographie, Politik, Familiendynamik und Bildung und sind damit bis auf wenige Extremfälle nur sehr schwer zu bestimmen.

Die Sammlung von Ghibaudos seltsamen Kreaturen erinnert an unsere innere Verrücktheit Exotismus und Einheit, um zu unterstreichen, dass all die besonderen Eigenschaften, die jeden von uns als einzigartiges Wesen ausmachen, unsere Stärken sind. Gleichzeitig könnten diese Eigenschaften die Auslöser für alle sozialen Spannungen und Diskriminierungen sein, die aus der menschlichen Schwierigkeit resultieren, das Andere und Äußere unseres eigenen persönlichen Mikrokosmos zu akzeptieren, sowohl auf persönlicher als auch auf gemeinschaftlicher Ebene. Tatsache ist, dass viele Hinweise auf die Gefangenschaft exotischer Tiere, Pflanzen und Kuriositäten” – auch von Menschen – von Entdeckern und Wissenschaftlern im Laufe der Jahrhunderte gesammelt wurden.
Ghibaudo belebt seine erstaunlichen, fantastischen Kreaturen, geht weiter als Salvador Dali, der monströse Skulpturen aus Bronze schuf, indem er lediglich ihre Proportionen dehnte. Dario gab seinen Tieren Leben, Haut, Atem, Gedanken und Emotionen. Dank der Wahl des Materials glaubt man dem Künstler, dass sie hundertprozentig echt sind, Limoges-Porzellan ist eines der empfindlichsten Materialien für Skulpturen. Damit, erzählt uns der Künstler, dass die Welt und die Existenz dieser Kreaturen zerbrechlich ist. Sie sind eine bedrohte Spezies, die Schutz und Respekt braucht. Das sieht man wie eine symbolische Einladung, uns selbst zu schützen und auch all die Besonderheiten, die uns einzigartig machen zu nähren.

David Hochbaum verbringt viel Zeit damit, die Orte zu fotografieren, die er als Kind und als junger Mann besuchte, um das figurative Element eines bestimmten Ortes und einer bestimmten Zeit zu injizieren. Dieser Prozess in Kombination mit der spontanen Kreation im Studio ermöglicht es ihm, seine Erinnerungen und seine persönliche Geschichte neu zu erschaffen und zu erfinden, indem er subtile Referenzen auf aktuelle Ereignisse hinzufügt, die mit und um ihn herum geschehen.
Seine Collagen aus Städten und Türmen spiegeln die Umgebung der Städte wider, in denen er lebte, und die Orte, die er im Laufe der Jahre bereist hat. Die Städte in Hochbaums Werk sind zugleich Porträts und Landschaften, die den Schichten der Architektur, den Elementen und Gesten des Menschen geben. Die Menschen werden zu Städten und die Städte zu Porträts der Figuren. Und da die Mythologie früher das universelle Wissen über den Geist der Tage weitergegeben hat, gibt uns die persönliche Mythisierung des Lebens des Künstlers und der Menschen darin einen Einblick in den Geist unserer Zeit, reich an Hoffnungen, Wünschen, Emotionen, Erinnerungen und Träumen.

Es scheint, dass die Kunst von Hochbaum und Ghibaudo stark von den surrealistischen Bewegungen beeinflusst wird, aber von verschiedenen Seiten.

Dario Ghibaudo modelliert Limoges Porzellan mit den Händen, um die Population seines Bestirars zu erschaffen, und mit Ausnahme der sporadischen Verwendung von Blattgold lebt er seine Kreationen ungefärbt. In seiner Arbeit konnten wir die Selektivität des akademischen Ansatzes des Surrealismus – das sonore Schweigen – wie in Kay Sales Gemälden sehen, oder die Anmut, die Raffinesse und die Nicht-Traditionalität einiger von Dalis Meisterwerken.
David Hochbaums Arbeiten sind das Ergebnis von Experimenten mit allen Techniken der bildenden Kunst, die er während seines Studiums erlernt hat, wie der Fotografie, der Malerei, der Holzbearbeitung, dem Film und der Skulptur. Die Farben sind oft laut und die Komposition ist reich an unterschiedlichen Elementen, die sich um wiederkehrende Themen und Themen drehen und uns subtil einladen, in ihnen den Reichtum und die Verspieltheit symbolischer Bedeutungen wie Max Ernst zu erkennen.

Der offensichtlichste kunsthistorische Bezug in Hochbaums Werk ist jedoch derjenige, der sich auf das berühmte Gemälde “Der Turm zu Babel” von Pieter Bruegel dem Älteren bezieht. Hochbaums erste Begegnung mit dem flämischen Maler war, als er im Alter von etwa 7 Jahren durch die Bücher seiner Mutter durchblätterte. Er war verblüfft über die detaillierten Landschaften und Farben, die die übermäßig gesättigten skurrilen Welten von Kinderbüchern widerspiegelten, wie das Werk von Richard Scarry, von dem er in dieser Zeit seines Lebens besessen war. Der Moment, in dem er auf das Bild des Turms von Babel und des Triumphs des Todes stieß, bezeichnet der Künstler als “Der Moment, in dem ich online kam, um eine überwältigende emotionale Reaktion auf die Kunst zu erkennen und ihre potentielle Bewegungskraft zu erkennen”.

Jahrzehnte später verweist Hochbaum weiterhin auf den flämischen Künstler durch Farbe und Struktur. Mit diesem Einfluss baut er seine eigene Erzählung auf, indem er Konzept und Medien manipuliert und seine eigene persönliche Reise und sein zeitgenössisches Leben durchdringt.

download the dossier
share on